Digital nomads - who are they and how much do they earn?

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I move seven times a year. I pack up all my stuff, move out of my old apartment and move into a new one. In an average of 3 years, that's one move every 52 days. Sometimes the new place is in a different part of town, sometimes in a different country.

I move seven times a year. I pack up all my stuff, move out of my old apartment and move into a new one. In an average of 3 years, that's one move every 52 days. Sometimes the new place is in a different part of town, sometimes in a different country.

If you stop the story there, people think I'm a fugitive criminal or a circus performer. That's not true, although I can throw knives.

There are a lot of people like me already. So many that some progressive states create special conditions to make the country more attractive to us. While for officials in other countries, nomads are still people with a leather tent, a tambourine and a personal herd of horses.

If you work in IT, you are particularly prone to nomadism. In this article, I'll try to introduce you to today's nomads. We'll interview a few representatives at the end.

You might like it and want to give it a try. There will be a bunch of links to community and job search/commissioning resources.

History of Emergence


Digital nomads are people who are not tethered to a place through remote work and, as a consequence, are constantly moving. With a laptop on your lap, you can be by the sea in Goa one day, at a table in a London coffee shop the next, on the veranda next to the barn of the Hungarian shepherd Gustav the day after.

One of the first to take a job on the road was Steve Roberts in 1983, almost simultaneously with the launch of the Motosat satellite network that made the Internet more mobile. While moving around the U.S. on a recumbent bicycle, he continued to make money writing magazine articles.

If there are any Nabokov readers here, you'll remember that in the novel Lolita (1953), the characters travel around America for more than a year. That said, there is a hint in the book that the protagonist does not stop writing all that time, which is what he lives on. We can assume that digital nomads were preceded by analog (postal) nomads.

Globally, the digital nomad movement took shape in 2008 - 2010, when access to broadband grew everywhere in the world. In parallel came Skype (2003), AirBnB (2008), and the book "How to Work 4 Hours a Week..." Timothy Ferris (2007). PayPal for convenient remote transactions has been around for a long time.

The exact number of nomads (or as my foreign friends sometimes jokingly say, e-mongols) is difficult to estimate. Among U.S. citizens there are 4.8 million. A Wyse Travel Confederation study showed that 0.6% of all tourists (which is 1.4 billion) call themselves digital nomads. It can be assumed that today there are about 8.5-12 million digital nomads (figure adjusted after discussion in the comments). Experts believe that by 2035 their number may reach 1 billion people!

Commune

The disadvantage of working remotely is the lack of communication with colleagues and like-minded people. Especially in an unfamiliar country where you hardly know the language. Therefore, nomads have a need to join a community - real or virtual.

Source: https://citizenremote.com/blog/digital-nomad-salaries-in-2022/

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